Spanking Kids Causes Harm

So says a study reported by Yahoo News.

TORONTO (Reuters) – Spanking children can cause long-term developmental damage and may even lower a child’s IQ, according to a new Canadian analysis that seeks to shift the ethical debate over corporal punishment into the medical sphere.

The study, published this week in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, reached its conclusion after examining 20 years of published research on the issue. The authors say the medical finding have been largely overlooked and overshadowed by concerns that parents should have the right to determine how their children are disciplined.

While spanking is certainly not as widespread as it was 20 years ago, many still cling to the practice and see prohibiting spanking as limiting the rights of parents.

That point of view highlights the difficulty in changing hearts and minds on the issue, despite a mountain of accumulated evidence showing the damage physical punishment can have on a child, says Joan Durant, a professor at University of Manitoba and one of the authors of the study.

“We’re really past the point of calling this a controversy. That’s a word that’s used and I don’t know why, because in the research there really is no controversy,” she said in an interview.

Well, there you have it. The Science is Settled. There is no controversy. Our masters have spoken. Obviously parents should have no right to discipline children as they see fit. What do they know?

I like this part.

“What people have realized is that physical punishment doesn’t only predict aggression consistently, it also predicts internalizing kinds of difficulties, like depression and substance use,” said Durant.

“There are no studies that show any long term positive outcomes from physical punishment.”

I think better behaved children might be a positive outcome. Since spanking has fallen into disrepute, more and more children have become ungovernable brats. I could make some sort of connection but I am obviously not qualified to dispute Settled Science.

With the study, Durant hopes parents will start to look at the issue from a medical perspective.

“What we’re hoping is that physicians will take that message and do more to counsel parents around this and to help them understand that physical punishment isn’t getting them where they want to go,” she said.

She also hopes that countries that allow the practice – including Canada – will take another look at their child protection laws.

Because we can’t allow parents to decide how to raise children. It takes a village, or at least governments to do it right.

And, to conclude with some comedy,

Canada is one of more than 190 countries to have ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, a 1989 treaty that sets out protections for children.

The treaty – which has been ratified by all UN member states except for the United States, Somalia and South Sudan – includes a passage stating that countries must protect children from “all forms of physical or mental violence”.

Somehow the fact that states such as Saudi Arabia and Pakistan have signed this treaty has not prevented the practice of honor killings in these countries. But then, that treaty is not about the welfare of children. It is about eroding the concept of national sovereignty. This study, I suspect, is not about spanking. It is about giving the state an increased opportunity to intervene in private life.

Remember, “Everything in the State, nothing outside the State, nothing against the State.”

Tags: , ,

5 Responses to “Spanking Kids Causes Harm”

  1. Jim White Says:

    Spare the rod; spoil the child. Bring corporal punishment back to public schools. I bet that would stop the school shootings.

  2. Justin Hoffer Says:

    I was spanked and have an IQ around 140. Most of the dumb children I had to spend my time in school with were the ones that had not been spanked. Actually, I don’t think I knew a single stupid child that had been spanked. Meanwhile, many of the smart ones had been. The children that hadn’t been spanked were the biggest trouble-makers and paid the least attention in school. The ones that had been paid the most.

    Based on my personal observance of hundreds of children, I’d say that these “researchers” took their bias into the study with them, and looked for an answer which they wanted, rather than doing an objective study.

    • David Hoffman Says:

      Now see, if you hadn’t been spanked you would have an IQ of 240 and would be on your way to Stockholm to pick up your Nobel Prize for your work in Unified Field Theory.

      I think I dropped the ball on this post by not noting what a atrocious piece of junk science a study like this is. Even if they could demonstrate a relationship between anti-social behavior in adults and being spanked in childhood, that would not demonstrate causality. I suppose it wouldn’t occur to these people that someone who acts up as an adult most likely acted up as a child and thus was more likely to be punished, even spanked than a well behaved child.

      • Justin Hoffer Says:

        More good points. Controls for such things, however, would never be added by the people who conducted this study.

Comments are closed.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 341 other followers

%d bloggers like this: