Posts Tagged ‘Trayvon Martin’

UN Concerns About the Trayvon Martin Shooting

September 7, 2013

I hadn’t thought that I would write anymore about this incident but it would seem that the United Nations has taken an interest in the matter, specifically if it has been properly investigated as a hate crime. I heard about this story courtesy of The Last Resistance.

3 September 2013 – A group of United Nations independent experts today called on the Government of the United States to finalize the ongoing review of the case involving the death of teenager Trayvon Martin, an African –American teenager who was shot in 2012 by a neighbourhood watchman in the state of Florida.

“We call upon the US Government to examine its laws that could have discriminatory impact on African Americans, and to ensure that such laws are in full compliance with the country’s international legal obligations and relevant standards,” said human rights expert Verene Shepherd, who currently heads the UN Working Group of Experts of People of African Descent.

The death of Trayvon Martin sparked a new debate about racial profiling in the United States after the unarmed black 17-year-old was shot and killed in Florida by George Zimmerman, a neighbourhood watchman. Mr. Zimmerman, who argued that he acted in self-defence and with justifiable use of deadly force, was found not guilty of all charges against him.

The US Department of Justice, the US Attorney’s Office for the Middle District of Florida and the Federal Bureau of Investigation are currently evaluating the evidence generated during the federal investigation, as well as the evidence and testimony from the state trial, trying to establish potential civil rights charges linked to the case.

“The Trayvon Martin case has highlighted the importance of the need to review those existing laws and policies that can have a discriminatory effect on the basis of race, as African Americans become more vulnerable to such discrimination,” Ms. Shepherd said, recalling that the US has been party to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights since 1992, the International Convention on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination since 1994, and many other international human rights law treaties.

“States are required to take effective measures to review governmental, national and local policies, and to amend, rescind or nullify any laws and regulations which have the effect of creating or perpetuating racial discrimination wherever it exists,” said the Special Rapporteur on racism, Mutuma Ruteere.

According to the 2011 US Department of Justice Hate Crime Statistics, 71.9 per cent of the total number of victims of hate crimes reported to the nation’s law enforcement agencies were victims of an offender’s anti-black bias. In a 2012 survey, the local non-governmental organization Malcolm X Grassroots Movement found that at least 136 unarmed African Americans were killed by police, security guards and self-appointed vigilantes over the course of a single year.

I wonder how many Whites were victims of an offender’s anti-white bias, or perhaps that doesn’t  count.

If you go through the roster of the 193 members of the United Nations, you will find few, if any, countries that have not discriminated against some group on the basis of race or ethnicity, as well as religious discrimination, discrimination against women, etc. In many places this is still very much an ongoing problem. You will also find that there are few countries that have made more of an effort to redress past and present discrimination than the United States. If the United Nations is really interested in fighting against discrimination and violations of basic human rights, there are many places where there efforts are more urgently needed than here in America They could, for instance, take up the problem of the Christians in the Middle East, the Kurds in Turkey, the Tibetans and others in the People’s Republic of China, etc. In other words, the US has one of the best human rights records in the world and we certainly do not need to be lectured to by a corrupt organization composed of dictators and kleptocrats.

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What is the Truth?

August 13, 2013

I suppose in the broadest philosophical sense none of us can really know what the truth is. Still, as far as specific facts go, it is sometimes easy enough to discover the truth. For example, the sequence of events that occurred on the evening of February 26, 2012 at Sanford, Florida are easy enough to learn. The question is whether some people care to know what the truth is. Consider this mural shown at the Florida State Capital building, along with these comments by Robert Laurie at Caintv.

1cc632248cDream-Defenders-Trayvon-mural

 

This weekend, a new mural entitled “We are all Trayvon Martin” was unveiled inside Florida’s Capitol in Tallahassee.  It’s a lovely piece of work, featuring a man shooting a hooded figure in the back of the head.  At 10 feet long, there’s also room for the bleeding visage of Martin Luther King Jr. and the words “we are all Trayvon Martin” in multiple languages.

Apparently, that’s supposed to bring together the peoples of many nations. …or something.

Many have speculated that the shooter is supposed to resemble George Zimmerman. That seems unlikely though, since Zimmerman would have been portaryed with a broken nose, and a head that was bleeding after being repeatedly slammed into the pavement. Clearly, this is a high-quality work of art, and the painter would not have overlooked those important details.

In place of Trayvon’s face, Miami artist Huong has inserted a mirror, so you can see what it would look like if you were being shot by an unnamed assailant who you had not physically attacked in any way whatsoever.

That this was unveiled in the State’s Capitol building?  Simply unbelievable.

This mural is simply a lie. George Zimmerman did not shoot a fleeing Trayvon Martin in the back. Either the artist couldn’t be bothered to make the minimal effort required to learn what actually happened or simply doesn’t care what the facts are so long as the narrative is pushed. It seems to me that an awful lot of trouble could have been averted if the media had done their job and reported the facts instead of trying to fabricate a morality play on the state of race relations in America.

George Zimmerman is a Good Man

July 29, 2013

I have not written anything on the characters of the two people involved in the altercation at Sanford, Florida which led to the death  of Trayvon Martin simply because I do not know anything about their personal lives and it didn’t seem to be at all relevant to the issues of the incident and the trial. I still cannot say very much about Martin. He seems to have been involved in some petty crimes and perhaps was a somewhat troubled young man. I think it likely that he would have changed once he grew up and might well have been a successful member of his community. We will never know.

As for George Zimmerman, the story of his rescue of a family in an accident tells us a lot about his character. Here is the story from Fox News.

George Zimmerman, who has not been seen publicly since his acquittal in the murder of Trayvon Martin earlier this month, surfaced last week to rescue an unidentified family trapped in an overturned vehicle on a Florida highway, police said Monday.

Sanford Police Department Capt. Jim McAuliffe told Fox News that Zimmerman, 29, was identified by a crash victim as the man who pulled him from the mangled vehicle.

“George Zimmerman pulled me out,” firefighters were told by the unidentified driver, according to McAuliffe.

The Seminole County Sheriff’s Office said the single-car accident occurred July 17 at approximately 5:45 pm. and involved a blue Ford Explorer SUV that had left the road and rolled over.

The sheriff’s office said there were four occupants inside — two parents and two children. There were no reports of injuries.

The deputy responding to the crash said that when he arrived, two men — one of whom was Zimmerman — had already gotten the family out of the overturned vehicle.

Zimmerman was not a witness to the crash and left after making contact with the deputy, the sheriff’s office said.

The crash occurred at the intersection of I-4 and Route 417 in Sanford, police said.

He didn’t have to do that. Given his notoriety, he could have simply kept on driving and not shown his face in public. That might have been safer for him. He also didn’t have to volunteer to be the coordinator for the neighborhood watch. He didn’t have to try to stop a wave of burglaries in his neighborhood.   He didn’t have to protest the police beating of a Black homeless man and accuse the Sanford police of conspiring to cover up the event. He could have lived his life looking the other way, like most of us do. He didn’t He was evidently the sort of man who stepped up and took responsibility. That makes him a good man and a hero.

To get an idea of what he is facing, here is the rest of the article at Fox News.

In another development, Sanford police confirmed that Monday they had delivered boxes of evidence from their Zimmerman investigation, including his firearm, to the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Department of Justice.

Zimmerman was acquitted of second-degree murder on July 13 in the killing of Trayvon Martin on Feb. 26, 2012.

Zimmerman’s parents, meanwhile, have told ABC News that they have received death threats and have been unable to return to their home following the verdict

“We have had an enormous amount of death threats,” Robert Zimmerman said. “George’s legal counsel has had death threats, the police chief of Sanford, many people have had death threats … ‘Everyone with Georgie’s DNA should be killed’ — just every kind of horrible thing you can imagine.”

And while the family he rescued are grateful, they would rather not say anything about what happened. That is understandable, considering the circumstances, but also cowardly and ungrateful. Here is their story in the Daily Mail.

The family rescued by George Zimmerman after a rollover crash in Florida are terrified they will become targets for hate mobs who have made death threats to the neighborhood vigilante.

Mark and Dana Michelle Gerstle told friends they do not want to talk publicly about Zimmerman for fear they will be accused of portraying him as a hero – and face a backlash from those who consider he got away with murder.

‘They are very grateful to Zimmerman for what he did, but they do not want to get involved,’ said a friend, who asked not to be named.

‘There is so much hatred directed towards him they have got to think about their own family. There are a lot of crazies out there. If they say anything in support of him it could backfire.’

The neighborhood watch volunteer, who to many is the most hated man in America after being acquitted of the murder of Trayvon Martin, helped save the family after a terrifying crash.

Friends of the couple, who make regular trips from their home to the Disney theme parks in Orlando, said they will be concerned that they could become targets for hate mobs who have threatened revenge for the death of Trayvon Martin.

‘Let’s face it, George Zimmerman is pretty toxic right now,’ said a friend.

‘Mark has two young children and has got to live his life round here. Why would he want to mark himself out.

‘Whatever he says could be taken out of context. If he praises Zimmerman then people will say he is making him into a hero. It is easier if he says nothing.’

Such is life in Obama’s America. George Zimmerman has been declared an enemy of the people, by the President himself and anyone who gives him aid and comfort faces the wrath of the mob. Well, I will praise him, where praise is deserved. He is a good man and should be celebrated rather than threatened, and it says a lot about our degradation as a country that he is not.

One More Thing

July 21, 2013

I really want to move on from the George Zimmerman trial, but I keep thinking about President Obama’s statement. There is something that he said that really bothers me.

The second thing I want to say is to reiterate what I said on Sunday, which is there’s going to be a lot of arguments about the legal issues in the case — I’ll let all the legal analysts and talking heads address those issues. The judge conducted the trial in a professional manner. The prosecution and the defense made their arguments. The juries were properly instructed that in a case such as this reasonable doubt was relevant, and they rendered a verdict. And once the jury has spoken, that’s how our system works.

I wish that he had stopped there. That is the only thing he needed to say and if he had stopped with that he might have done a great deal of good for this country. He had to continue in order to put things in context, though.

But I did want to just talk a little bit about context and how people have responded to it and how people are feeling.

You know, when Trayvon Martin was first shot I said that this could have been my son. Another way of saying that is Trayvon Martin could have been me 35 years ago. And when you think about why, in the African American community at least, there’s a lot of pain around what happened here, I think it’s important to recognize that the African American community is looking at this issue through a set of experiences and a history that doesn’t go away.

There are very few African American men in this country who haven’t had the experience of being followed when they were shopping in a department store. That includes me. There are very few African American men who haven’t had the experience of walking across the street and hearing the locks click on the doors of cars. That happens to me — at least before I was a senator. There are very few African Americans who haven’t had the experience of getting on an elevator and a woman clutching her purse nervously and holding her breath until she had a chance to get off. That happens often.

And I don’t want to exaggerate this, but those sets of experiences inform how the African American community interprets what happened one night in Florida. And it’s inescapable for people to bring those experiences to bear. The African American community is also knowledgeable that there is a history of racial disparities in the application of our criminal laws — everything from the death penalty to enforcement of our drug laws. And that ends up having an impact in terms of how people interpret the case.

Now, this isn’t to say that the African American community is naïve about the fact that African American young men are disproportionately involved in the criminal justice system; that they’re disproportionately both victims and perpetrators of violence. It’s not to make excuses for that fact — although black folks do interpret the reasons for that in a historical context. They understand that some of the violence that takes place in poor black neighborhoods around the country is born out of a very violent past in this country, and that the poverty and dysfunction that we see in those communities can be traced to a very difficult history.

And so the fact that sometimes that’s unacknowledged adds to the frustration. And the fact that a lot of African American boys are painted with a broad brush and the excuse is given, well, there are these statistics out there that show that African American boys are more violent — using that as an excuse to then see sons treated differently causes pain.

I think the African American community is also not naïve in understanding that, statistically, somebody like Trayvon Martin was statistically more likely to be shot by a peer than he was by somebody else. So folks understand the challenges that exist for African American boys. But they get frustrated, I think, if they feel that there’s no context for it and that context is being denied. And that all contributes I think to a sense that if a white male teen was involved in the same kind of scenario, that, from top to bottom, both the outcome and the aftermath might have been different.

Now, the question for me at least, and I think for a lot of folks, is where do we take this? How do we learn some lessons from this and move in a positive direction? I think it’s understandable that there have been demonstrations and vigils and protests, and some of that stuff is just going to have to work its way through, as long as it remains nonviolent. If I see any violence, then I will remind folks that that dishonors what happened to Trayvon Martin and his family. But beyond protests or vigils, the question is, are there some concrete things that we might be able to do.

What does all of this have to do with the actual trial? George Zimmerman was on trial for killing Trayvon Martin. The jury decided, reasonably in my opinion, that there was not enough evidence to convict Zimmerman of murder. George Zimmerman was not on trial for the past iniquities of American race relations. The treatment of African-Americans in this country has often been unjust and deplorable. We have made much progress in recent decades and will continue to do so, despite the efforts of race-hustlers like the President.

However, the trial of George Zimmerman could only be conducted on the basis of the facts in the case. The jury could only decide the verdict based on the facts presented to them by the attorneys. They could not and should not have taken into account America’s past history of race relations. That was irrelevant to the question of whether or not George Zimmerman is guilty of the charges brought against him. With his remarks, President Obama seems to be trying to make the Zimmerman trial a trial on American race relations. Would he have preferred that the jury find Zimmerman guilty as some sort of recompense for past injustices? Considering the efforts of his Justice Department to retry Zimmerman, I think the answer must be yes, even if the result is unjust for Mr. Zimmerman. Here again we see the difference between “social justice“, and actual justice.

The President Speaks

July 19, 2013

And I wish that he would just shut up. Here is a full transcript of his remarks. I was going to copy them here but they are rather long, so I will only put in excerpts that I wish to comment upon.

First of all, I want to make sure that, once again, I send my thoughts and prayers, as well as Michelle’s, to the family of Trayvon Martin, and to remark on the incredible grace and dignity with which they’ve dealt with the entire situation. I can only imagine what they’re going through, and it’s remarkable how they’ve handled it.

What about the family of George Zimmerman? They are living in fear because of the large number of death threats they have received. Does the president have nothing to say to them? What about George Zimmerman? Can he not affirm that he was acquitted and should not be terrorized?

The second thing I want to say is to reiterate what I said on Sunday, which is there’s going to be a lot of arguments about the legal issues in the case — I’ll let all the legal analysts and talking heads address those issues. The judge conducted the trial in a professional manner. The prosecution and the defense made their arguments. The juries were properly instructed that in a case such as this reasonable doubt was relevant, and they rendered a verdict. And once the jury has spoken, that’s how our system works. But I did want to just talk a little bit about context and how people have responded to it and how people are feeling.

You know, when Trayvon Martin was first shot I said that this could have been my son. Another way of saying that is Trayvon Martin could have been me 35 years ago. And when you think about why, in the African American community at least, there’s a lot of pain around what happened here, I think it’s important to recognize that the African American community is looking at this issue through a set of experiences and a history that doesn’t go away.

There are very few African American men in this country who haven’t had the experience of being followed when they were shopping in a department store. That includes me. There are very few African American men who haven’t had the experience of walking across the street and hearing the locks click on the doors of cars. That happens to me — at least before I was a senator. There are very few African Americans who haven’t had the experience of getting on an elevator and a woman clutching her purse nervously and holding her breath until she had a chance to get off. That happens often.

If President Obama had a son, he would not be Trayvon Martin. He would be attending an exclusive private school, just as the President’s daughters are attending and he would have many opportunities that other Americans, White or Black, do not have. Barack Obama spent much of his young life either abroad, or being raised by his White mother and his White grandmother in predominantly White and well off neighborhoods. He has led a life of privilege. Trayvon Martin was not attending a private college-prep school, like Obama did, and it is very unlikely that he would have been able to attend Harvard Law School, no matter how bright he might have been. Barack Obama’s life experiences have not been typical of most African-Americans, no matter how much he would like to pretend they have.

And so the fact that sometimes that’s unacknowledged adds to the frustration. And the fact that a lot of African American boys are painted with a broad brush and the excuse is given, well, there are these statistics out there that show that African American boys are more violent — using that as an excuse to then see sons treated differently causes pain.

It is not an excuse. It experience teaches us that African American boys are more likely to commit a violence crime, then it is sensible to be wary of African American boys. If Asian girls or Native American transvestites committed a disproporionate share of the crimes in the US, people would be wary of them. The question must be, what are we going to do about this, besides blaming racism.

I think the African American community is also not naïve in understanding that, statistically, somebody like Trayvon Martin was statistically more likely to be shot by a peer than he was by somebody else. So folks understand the challenges that exist for African American boys. But they get frustrated, I think, if they feel that there’s no context for it and that context is being denied. And that all contributes I think to a sense that if a white male teen was involved in the same kind of scenario, that, from top to bottom, both the outcome and the aftermath might have been different.

If a White male teen had knocked an armed man to the ground and was pummeling him, the outcome might have been much the same. The only difference is that the race hustlers and the Left would have had nothing to work with and the case would never have gotten national attention.

Now, the question for me at least, and I think for a lot of folks, is where do we take this? How do we learn some lessons from this and move in a positive direction? I think it’s understandable that there have been demonstrations and vigils and protests, and some of that stuff is just going to have to work its way through, as long as it remains nonviolent. If I see any violence, then I will remind folks that that dishonors what happened to Trayvon Martin and his family. But beyond protests or vigils, the question is, are there some concrete things that we might be able to do.

I know that Eric Holder is reviewing what happened down there, but I think it’s important for people to have some clear expectations here. Traditionally, these are issues of state and local government, the criminal code. And law enforcement is traditionally done at the state and local levels, not at the federal levels.

I think Eric Holder should leave George Zimmerman alone. The constitution forbids double jeopardy for a reason

Number one, precisely because law enforcement is often determined at the state and local level, I think it would be productive for the Justice Department, governors, mayors to work with law enforcement about training at the state and local levels in order to reduce the kind of mistrust in the system that sometimes currently exists.

If he wants to reduce the mistrust that currently exists, how about reining in Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton.

When I was in Illinois, I passed racial profiling legislation, and it actually did just two simple things. One, it collected data on traffic stops and the race of the person who was stopped. But the other thing was it resourced us training police departments across the state on how to think about potential racial bias and ways to further professionalize what they were doing.

And initially, the police departments across the state were resistant, but actually they came to recognize that if it was done in a fair, straightforward way that it would allow them to do their jobs better and communities would have more confidence in them and, in turn, be more helpful in applying the law. And obviously, law enforcement has got a very tough job.

And I’m doing my best to make it tougher.

I know that there’s been commentary about the fact that the “stand your ground” laws in Florida were not used as a defense in the case. On the other hand, if we’re sending a message as a society in our communities that someone who is armed potentially has the right to use those firearms even if there’s a way for them to exit from a situation, is that really going to be contributing to the kind of peace and security and order that we’d like to see?

And for those who resist that idea that we should think about something like these “stand your ground” laws, I’d just ask people to consider, if Trayvon Martin was of age and armed, could he have stood his ground on that sidewalk? And do we actually think that he would have been justified in shooting Mr. Zimmerman who had followed him in a car because he felt threatened? And if the answer to that question is at least ambiguous, then it seems to me that we might want to examine those kinds of laws.

We ought not to allow people to defend themselves. To answer the question, if Mr. Zimmerman had assaulted Martin, then certainly Martin would have had the right to stand his ground and defend himself.

And then, finally, I think it’s going to be important for all of us to do some soul-searching. There has been talk about should we convene a conversation on race. I haven’t seen that be particularly productive when politicians try to organize conversations. They end up being stilted and politicized, and folks are locked into the positions they already have. On the other hand, in families and churches and workplaces, there’s the possibility that people are a little bit more honest, and at least you ask yourself your own questions about, am I wringing as much bias out of myself as I can? Am I judging people as much as I can, based on not the color of their skin, but the content of their character? That would, I think, be an appropriate exercise in the wake of this tragedy.

The truth is that you can not be honest about matters of race in this country. But if we want to have that conversation, why don’t we start with the fact that many Blacks are prejudiced against Whites?

And let me just leave you with a final thought that, as difficult and challenging as this whole episode has been for a lot of people, I don’t want us to lose sight that things are getting better. Each successive generation seems to be making progress in changing attitudes when it comes to race. It doesn’t mean we’re in a post-racial society. It doesn’t mean that racism is eliminated. But when I talk to Malia and Sasha, and I listen to their friends and I seem them interact, they’re better than we are — they’re better than we were — on these issues. And that’s true in every community that I’ve visited all across the country.

And so we have to be vigilant and we have to work on these issues. And those of us in authority should be doing everything we can to encourage the better angels of our nature, as opposed to using these episodes to heighten divisions. But we should also have confidence that kids these days, I think, have more sense than we did back then, and certainly more than our parents did or our grandparents did; and that along this long, difficult journey, we’re becoming a more perfect union — not a perfect union, but a more perfect union.

The tragedy of Barack Obama is that he could have done much to promote racial healing in this country. Being half White and half Black he could have been a sort of bridge bring people together. Most Whites were happy to see a Black man being elected president. Barack Obama chose not to play that role. He decided to embrace the politics of division, of envy, of class hatred and racial animosity. His country is the worse for it.

 

 

Jesse Jackson is a Human Leach

July 18, 2013
English: Reverend Jesse Jackson Sr. discusses ...

Human leach

In a column that appeared in the Chicago Sun-Times, Jesse Jackson called for a United Nations investigation into the racial context behind the death of Trayvon Martin.

If Trayvon Martin were not a young black male, he would be alive today. Despite the verdict, it’s clear that George Zimmerman would never have confronted a young white man wearing a hoodie. He would, at the very least, have listened to the cops and stayed back. Trayvon Martin is dead because Zimmerman believed that “these guys always get away” and chose not to wait for the police.

Trayvon Martin’s death shatters the convenient myths that blind us to reality. That reality, as the Chicago Sun-Times editorial board wrote, is that “black men carry a special burden from the day they are born.”

Both the prosecutor and the defense claimed that the trial was not about race. But Trayvon Martin was assumed to be threatening just for walking while being young, black and male.

That is the reality that can no longer be ignored. Through the years, gruesome horrors — the murder of Emmitt Till, the shooting of Medgar Evers in his front yard — have galvanized African Americans and public action on civil rights. Trayvon Martin’s death should do the same.

I do not know if the Rev. Jackson is ignorant of the actual events of the shooting or if he is a liar. Considering his past history of using real or imaginary racial grievances to extort corporations and enrich himself, I am going to go with liar. The truth is that Martin’s skin color was irrelevant to the question of whether he would have died that night. Here is the transcript of the 911 call that George Zimmerman made.

Dispatcher

Sanford Police Department.

Zimmerman

Hey we’ve had some break-ins in my neighborhood, and there’s a real suspicious guy, uh, it’s Retreat View Circle, um, the best address I can give you is 111 Retreat View Circle. This guy looks like he’s up to no good, or he’s on drugs or something. It’s raining and he’s just walking around, looking about.

Dispatcher

OK, and this guy is he white, black, or hispanic?

Zimmerman

He looks black.

Dispatcher

Did you see what he was wearing?

Zimmerman

Yeah. A dark hoodie, like a grey hoodie, and either jeans or sweatpants and white tennis shoes. He’s here now, he was just staring.

Dispatcher

OK, he’s just walking around the area…

Zimmerman

looking at all the houses.

Dispatcher

OK…

Zimmerman

Now he’s just staring at me.

Dispatcher

OK-you said it’s 1111 Retreat View? Or 111?

Zimmerman

That’s the clubhouse…

Dispatcher

That’s the clubhouse, do you know what the-he’s near the clubhouse right now?

Zimmerman

Yeah, now he’s coming towards me.

Dispatcher

OK.

Zimmerman

He’s got his hand in his waistband. And he’s a black male.

Dispatcher

How old would you say he looks?

Zimmerman

He’s got button on his shirt, late teens.

Dispatcher

Late teens. Ok.

Zimmerman

Somethings wrong with him. Yup, he’s coming to check me out, he’s got something in his hands, I don’t know what his deal is.

Dispatcher

Just let me know if he does anything, ok?

Zimmerman

(unclear) See if you can get an officer over here.

Dispatcher

Yeah we’ve got someone on the way, just let me know if this guy does anything else.

Zimmerman

Okay. These (expletive) they always get away. Yep. When you come to the clubhouse you come straight in and make a left. Actually you would go past the clubhouse.

Dispatcher

So it’s on the lefthand side from the clubhouse?

Zimmerman

No you go in straight through the entrance and then you make a left, uh, you go straight in, don’t turn, and make a left. (expletive) he’s running.

Dispatcher

He’s running? Which way is he running?

Ambient sounds are heard which may be Zimmerman unbuckling his seat belt and his vehicle’s “open door” chime sounding. The change in his voice and the sound of wind against his cell phone mic indicate that he has left his vehicle and is now walking. The dispatcher seems to pick up on these changes and sounds concerned when he later asks Zimmerman if he is following Martin.

Zimmerman

Down towards the other entrance to the neighborhood.

Dispatcher

Which entrance is that that he’s heading towards?

Zimmerman

The back entrance…(expletive)(unclear)

This section of the recording has been the subject of much speculation. Some suggest that Zimmerman has just made a racial slur, but the audio is not clear.

Dispatcher

Are you following him?

Zimmerman

Yeah.

Dispatcher

Ok, we don’t need you to do that.

Zimmerman

Ok.

Dispatcher

Alright sir what is your name?

Zimmerman

George…He ran.

Dispatcher

Alright George what’s your last name?

A clicking or knocking sound can be heard here

Zimmerman

Zimmerman

Dispatcher

And George what’s the phone number you’re calling from?

Clicking or knocking sound is heard again

Zimmerman

[phone number removed]

Dispatcher

Alright George we do have them on the way. Do you want to meet with the officer when they get out there?

Zimmerman

Yeah.

Dispatcher

Alright, where you going to meet with them at?

For the remainder of the recording, Zimmerman sounds distracted. The knocking sound occurs several times during the final exchange with the dispatcher

Zimmerman

Um, if they come in through the, uh, (knocking sound) gate, tell them to go straight past the club house, and uh, (knocking sound) straight past the club house and make a left, and then they go past the mailboxes, that’s my truck…[unintelligible]

Dispatcher

What address are you parked in front of?

Zimmerman

I don’t know, it’s a cut through so I don’t know the address.

Dispatcher

Okay do you live in the area?

Zimmerman

Yeah, I…[unintelligible]

Dispatcher

What’s your apartment number?

Zimmerman

It’s a home it’s [house number removed], (knocking sound) oh crap I don’t want to give it all out, I don’t know where this kid is.

Dispatcher

Okay do you want to just meet with them right near the mailboxes then?

Zimmerman

Yeah that’s fine.

Dispatcher

Alright George, I’ll let them know to meet you around there, okay?

Zimmerman

Actually could you have them, could you have them call me and I’ll tell them where I’m at?

Dispatcher

Okay, yeah that’s no problem.

Zimmerman

Should I give you my number or you got it?

Dispatcher

Yeah I got it [phone number removed]

Zimmerman

Yeah you got it.

Dispatcher

Okay no problem, I’ll let them know to call you when you’re in the area.

Zimmerman

Thanks.

Dispatcher

You’re welcome.

Notice that Mr. Zimmerman did not identify Martin by race until the dispatcher asked him. Even then he seemed not to be certain at first. Perhaps the hoodie that Martin was wearing and the darkness made it difficult to be sure of his race. Notice that Zimmerman stated that the individual was acting in a suspicious manner, “on drugs or something”. It is clear that Zimmerman was not just following the first Black person he happened to see, nor did Martin appear to be just walking home.

It took me about 3 seconds to find this transcript via Google. What is Jackson’s excuse? Let’s go on.

What it dramatizes is what Michelle Alexander calls “the New Jim Crow.” Segregation is illegal; scurrilous racism unacceptable. But mass incarceration and a racially biased criminal justice system have served many of the same functions. Since 1970, we’ve witnessed a 600 percent increase in the number of people behind bars, overwhelmingly due to the war on drugs. Those imprisoned are disproportionately African Americans. The U.S. now imprisons a greater percentage of its black population than South Africa did at the height of apartheid.

Drug usage is not dramatically greater in the black community. But young black males are racially profiled, more likely to be stopped and frisked (something New York Mayor Bloomberg defends), more likely to be arrested if stopped, more likely to be charged if arrested, more likely to be jailed if charged. In schools, zero tolerance — once again enforced disproportionately against people of color — results in expulsions, creating a virtual pipeline to prison.

Why are so many young Black men in prison? Why are Black men more likely to be profiled? Black men are responsible for a disproportionate amount of the crime that occurs in the United States. It actually makes sense to profile Black men, even if the great majority of Blacks profiled are innocent of any crime. This is a deplorable situation, even if overall crime rates have been dropping in recent decades. This situation will not be resolved as long as influential people in the Black community insist on blaming “whitey” for all of their woes. We need to ask serious questions about why so many young Black men are attracted to criminal behavior. Until that happens the prison will continue to be filled with young Black men and young Black men will continue to be killed in self defense. The sad thing is that Jesse Jackson does seem to have some idea of what is going wrong.

 

The results are devastating. Young fathers are jailed. Children grow up in broken homes, in severe poverty, since those convicted never really leave prison. They face discrimination in employment, in housing, in the right to vote, in educational opportunities, in food stamps and public support. As Alexander argues, the U.S. hasn’t ended the racial caste system, it has redesigned it. 

 

As Trayvon Martin’s death shows us, the norm increasingly is to police and punish poor young men of color, not educate or empower them. And that norm makes it dangerous to be young, black and male in America. 

It is not just that young fathers are jailed. The public support that Jackson claims discriminates against Blacks tends to make young father superfluous. This might be part of the reason that around 70% of Black babies are born to a single mother. This high rate of illegitimacy has proven to be absolutely devastating. I suspect that the Black family was stronger during Jim Crow and even slavery than it is now. What is Jackson doing about this? Blaming others.

There are three possible reactions to this reality. African Americans can adjust to it, teaching their children how to survive against the odds. We can resent it, seething in suppressed fury until we can’t stand it anymore. Or we can resist, assert our rights to equal protection under the laws, and challenge openly the new reality.

We need a national investigation of the racial context that led to Trayvon Martin’s slaying. Congress must act. And it’s time to call on the United Nations Human Rights Commission for an in-depth investigation of whether the U.S. is upholding its obligations under international human rights laws and treaties. Trayvon Martin’s death demands much more than a jury’s verdict on George Zimmerman. It calls for us to hear the evidence and render a verdict on the racial reality that never had its day in court at the trial.

Or we could have an honest conversation about the causes of the problems that beset the Black community. We could teach young Black men to takes responsibility for themselves and not blame racism for every setback. But then, a community of confident achievers would have no use for the likes of Jesse Jackson. He is not and never will be part of the solution. He profits too much from the problem. He is a parasite, living off the misery of others.

 

Racial Tensions

July 17, 2013

Dennis Prager shares a few thoughts about “racial tensions” in his latest column.

The greatest hope most Americans — including Republicans — had when Barack Obama was elected president was that the election of a black person as the country’s president would reduce, if not come close to eliminating, the racial tensions that have plagued America for generations.

This has not happened. The election, and even the re-election, of a black man as president, in a country that is 87 percent non-black — a first in human history — has had no impact on what are called “racial tensions.”

In case there was any doubt about this, the reactions to the George Zimmerman trial have made it clear. The talk about “open season” on blacks, about blacks like Trayvon Martin being victims of nothing more than racial profiling and about a racist criminal justice system, has permeated black life and the left-wing mainstream media.

I put quotation marks around the term “racial tensions” because the term is a falsehood.

This term is stated as if whites and blacks are equally responsible for these tensions, as if the mistrust is morally and factually equivalent.

But this is not at all the case.

“Racial tensions” is a lie perpetrated by the left. A superb example is when the New York Times described the 1991 black anti-Semitic riots in Crown Heights, Brooklyn as “racial tensions.”

For those who do not recall, or who only read, viewed or listened to mainstream media reports, what happened was that mobs of blacks attacked Jews for three days after a black boy was accidentally hit and killed by a car driven by a Chasidic Jew.

He has some more to say about “racial tensions”, but it is the conclusion of his column that I am interested in.

Once one understands that “racial tensions” is a euphemism for a black animosity toward whites and a left-wing construct, one begins to understand why the election of a black president has had no impact on most blacks or on the left.

Since neither black animosity nor the left’s falsehood of “racial tensions” is based on the actual behavior of the vast majority of white Americans, nothing white America could do will affect either many blacks’ perceptions or the leftist libel.

That is why hopes that the election of black president would reduce “racial tensions” were naive. Though a white person is far more likely to be murdered by a black person than vice versa, all it took was one tragic death of a black kid to reignite the hatred that many blacks and virtually all black leaders have toward white America.

Let’s put this in perspective. Ben Jealous of the NAACP, Al Sharpton of MSNBC, Jesse Jackson, and the left-wing media compete to incite hatred of America generally and white America specifically. Over what? A tragic incident in which a Hispanic man (regularly labeled “white”) said, with all physical evidence to support him, that fearing for his life, he killed a black 17-year-old (regularly labeled “a child”).

The very fact that George Zimmerman — who is as white as Barack Obama — is labeled “white” bears testimony to the left-wing agenda of blaming white America and to the desire of many blacks to vent anger at whites.

And that is why the election of a black president has meant nothing. Indeed, to those whose lives and/or ideologies are predicated on labeling America and its white population as racist, it wouldn’t matter if half the Senate, half the House and half the governors were black.

It is an inconvenient truth, and one that is racist to acknowledge, but it is the Black or African-American population in the contemporary United States that is the most racist, at least in terms of being race conscious and of openly expressing their hatred of other races, especially Whites. It is not uncommon for Black public figures to make hateful statements that if said by a White would make him a pariah very quickly. White, except for unreconstructed racists, tend not to be very race conscious at all. Of course, this is because, in large part, Whites are still the majority and the norm in American society. Still, there is also the fact that Whites have been taught that racism in any form is evil and paying too much attention to race, except in a liberal, politically correct way is dangerously close to racist heresy. So, to the extent that many Whites are race conscious, they often despise their own race.

Justice demands that we treat everyone decently regardless of race and Christ commands His followers to treat everyone as a child of God. With that in mind, I can’t help but think there is something deeply unhealthy about a person railing against people who look like her.

Jared Taylor at American Renaissance has written about this quite often. He seems to believe that the best way to fight Black racial consciousness is to encourage White racial consciousness. This opinion often gets him labeled as a racist, perhaps with some justice. I think he is wrong, though. As I have already stated, Jesus Christ forbids us to be conscious of nationality race, sex or any other distinction except for Christ, as Paul writes,

Here there is no Gentile or Jew, circumcised or uncircumcised, barbarian, Scythian, slave or free, but Christ is all, and is in all. (Col 3:11)

For a more practical reason, if the demographers are correct and whites are going to become a minority in the next century, than the last thing we need is race consciousness of any sort. A nation composed of  about three or four “tribes”, each jealously conscious of its prerogatives can only lead to continuing and uncompromising conflicts and perhaps civil war. A multi-racial race conscious America would most likely resemble the former Yugoslavia then the country we are familiar with.

It would seem, then, that the only way to reduce racial tensions would be to reduce race consciousness for everyone. This would be the sensible thing to do, and perhaps the most just. It is too bad that the liberal media, the Democratic party, and the likes of Al Sharpton and Ben Jealous are not the least bit interested in doing what is sensible or just.

 

The Zimmerman Verdict

July 14, 2013

I must say that I am a little surprised that the jury found George Zimmerman not guilty. It was the right decision as far as I can tell from the way the trial went, but I was sure the jury would be intimidated by the threat of riots into finding Zimmerman guilty of manslaughter, at least. I guess our criminal justice system still works, sometimes.

I am not at all surprised by the comments of idiot celebrities who obviously are unaware what a disaster the prosecution made of this case.

Celebrities took to social media Saturday, expressing shock, outrage and sadness that neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman was found not guilty in the death of unarmed teen Trayvon Martin.

Some Twitter users – such as Russell Simmons, Sean “Diddy” Combs and Solange Knowles – posted a solid, black square for their Twitter avatar, a showing of support for the victim.

“Say a prayer for Trayvon Martin’s family,” Simmons wrote.

Donald Trump wasn’t surprised by the verdict.

“Zimmerman is no angel but the lack of evidence and the concept of self-defense, especially in Florida law, gave the jury little other choice,” he wrote.

New York Giants wide receiver Victor Cruz wrote an anti-Zimmerman Tweet but quickly deleted it.

“Thoroughly confused,” he wrote. “Zimmerman doesn’t last a year before the hood catches up to him.”

Rapper Talib Kweli expressed hope that Martin’s family will receive justice.

“The way this Zimmerman case divides us shows how far we still have to go as a country,” he wrote.

Here are some stupid tweets as recorded by Twitchy.com

Maddow Blog         @MaddowBlog

.@TheReidReport Message has been sent to black boys and their families that they prob should be worried about their child

If he is committing crime, they should be worried.
mia farrow         @MiaFarrow

Today,like many parents of black sons, I will remind them to watch their backs, be deferential if stopped by white men,stay out of Florida.

Or, not push a man to the ground and pummel him.

Toni Braxton         @tonibraxton

Today I am embarrassed to be an American…my heart goes out to the Martin family.

Feel free to leave any time.
I am also not surprised by politicians making use of this to further their own agendas.

President Obama called on the nation to honor Trayvon Martin a day after George Zimmerman was acquitted of his murder by asking “ourselves if we’re doing all we can to stem the tide of gun violence.”

His comments came as family members of Zimmerman and Martin, as well as pundits, celebrities, and court observers had strong reactions to Saturday’s not guilty verdict, with those reactions taking various forms — from joy and outrage to Shakespearean references and calls for peace.

“I now ask every American to respect the call for calm reflection from two parents who lost their young son. And as we do, we should ask ourselves if we’re doing all we can to widen the circle of compassion and understanding in our own communities,” Obama said in a statement on Sunday.

“We should ask ourselves if we’re doing all we can to stem the tide of gun violence that claims too many lives across this country on a daily basis. We should ask ourselves, as individuals and as a society, how we can prevent future tragedies like this. As citizens, that’s a job for all of us. That’s the way to honor Trayvon Martin.”

That is actually what George Zimmerman was trying to do, reduce crime and violence in his community. Considering what he went through, why would anyone take steps to stop crime in their neighborhood if they are the one who will be punished. Meanwhile in the President’s home town of Chicago, where they have some of the strictest gun control laws in the nation, the murder rate is at record highs. Most of the victims in Chicago are young black males, just like Trayvon Martin. Since there are no political points to be made about their deaths, nobody cares about them.

Al Sharpton thinks the verdict is a slap in the face. I can’t think of anyone who deserves a slap in the face more that Sharpton.

“Well, I think that this is an atrocity,” said Sharpton. “I think that it is probably one of the worst situations that I’ve seen. What this jury has done is establish a precedent that when you are young and fit a certain profile, you can be committing no crime, just bringing some Skittles and iced tea home to your brother, and be killed and someone can claim self-defense having been exposed with all kinds of lies, all kinds of inconsistencies. … Even at trial when he is exposed over and over again as a liar, he is acquitted. This is a sad day in the country. I think that we clearly must move on to the next step in terms of the federal government and in terms of the civil courts. Clearly, we want people to be disciplined, strategic. But this is a slap in the face to those that believe in justice in this country.”

The man who was behind the Tawana Brawley hoax, the Crown Heights riots, attacks on Jewish owned New York businesses, and other despicable and racist acts of violence does not have the right to say anything about justice. His whole career is based on injustice. It says something that this man is taken seriously by the mainstream media and the Democratic Party.

 

Zimmerman Sues NBC

December 7, 2012

Good for him!  George Zimmerman is suing NBC over their reporting of the incident between Zimmerman and Trayvon Martin. Whatever may be said about that incident, and I am not commenting on that here, it is obvious that their reporting was slipshod and perhaps intentionally deceptive. Here is the story I read at the Washington Post.

Lawyers for George Zimmerman filed suit today against NBC Universal Media over a well-publicized editing error that portrayed their client in racist terms in his pursuit of Trayvon Martin on a drizzly evening in February.

“NBC saw the death of Trayvon Martin not as a tragedy but as an opportunity to increase ratings, and so to set about the myth that George Zimmerman was a racist and predatory villain,” states the civil complaint in its opening salvo against NBC.

This is the part to pay attention to.

NBC’s editing of the 911 audiotape in the Martin case became a public fixation after the media-monitoring Web site NewsBusters.org noted editing oddities on a “Today” show broadcast March 27. Here’s how NBC News portrayed the audiotape:

Zimmerman: This guy looks like he’s up to no good. He looks black.

The full tape went like this:

Zimmerman: This guy looks like he’s up to no good. Or he’s on drugs or something. It’s raining and he’s just walking around, looking about.
Dispatcher: OK, and this guy — is he black, white or Hispanic?
Zimmerman: He looks black.

Zimmerman thus didn’t volunteer a racial profile of Martin; he was asked to provide it, a point that the lawsuit makes in colorful fashion: “NBC created this false and defamatory misimpression using the oldest form of yellow journalism: manipulating Zimmerman’s own words, splicing together disparate parts of the recording to create illusions of statements that Zimmerman never actually made.”

The suit contends that this and other examples were no innocent mistakes but a deliberate attempt to stir up racial trouble for the sake of higher ratings. I wouldn’t care to speculate on anyone’s motives but I think that the media has to be held accountable. If it turns out that NBC’s reporting of this case was intentionally deceitful, I hope Zimmerman wins the suit and I hope he cleans up.

By the way, I read some of the comments below the article. There is nothing quite so depressing as seeing how stupid many of these people are, on both sides of the issue.

A Modest Proposal Concerning the Trayvon Martin Murder

April 2, 2012

I have not been following the Trayvon Martin case or the controversy which has erupted over the last week or so to any great extent. Nevertheless, I would like to make a modest proposal in the interest of preserving the public order. I think that it would be best if anyone who is not directly connected with this case or has personal knowledge of the events would keep their mouths shut and not try to stir things up.This means, please don’t assume that George Zimmerman is a hateful bigot who shot Martin for no reason. Trayvon Martin was not a little kid. He was 17 years old and about the same size as Zimmerman. Zimmerman could well have believed he was acting in self-defense. That is for the courts to decide. As it is, the media frenzy over this issue may well make it impossible for him to get a fair trial anywhere in the country.

This also means not digging up dirt on Trayvon Martin. I don’t imagine that he was perfect. No doubt he was involved in all of the follies of youth. None of this is particularly relevant. It would also be nice if race hustling scoundrels wouldn’t try to make this tragedy into some sort of metaphor for race relations in America or use this to make political points, use twitter to promote vigilantism, blame the hoodie, or any other such foolish comments. Just keep quiet if you don’t know what you are talking about.


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