Posts Tagged ‘Marco Rubio’

Drop Out Jeb

January 19, 2016

That is the advice Glenn Reynolds gave to Jeb Bush in his column in USA Today last week.

Jeb Bush’s campaign is going nowhere, and that’s bad news for Jeb, but it’s good news for America. Now he just needs to perform one final service by dropping out. As a first step, he could follow Rand Paul out the door and skip Thursday night’s debate.

Almost exactly a year ago, I wrote in these pages that Jeb shouldn’t run.

I wrote: “There’s nothing really wrong with Jeb Bush. By all accounts he was a good governor in Florida. He seems like a nice guy. And I have no doubt that he’d make a better president than, say, Barack Obama, though at this point in Obama’s term that’s setting the bar pretty low. Even the National Journal, which called Obama’s past year ‘pretty awful,’ might agree.”

I continued: “But nice guy or not, he’s old blood. Leaving aside the matter of the Bush name — though neither his 2016 opponents nor his 2016 supporters will — he last ran for political office back in 2002. He’s fresh only insofar as he’s George W. Bush’syounger brother. Meanwhile, the GOP has a lot of actual fresh blood out there.”

Since then, Jeb’s campaign has never really gotten off the ground. Despite raising vast sums of money — and enriching various consultants in the process — Jeb hasn’t had a message that resonates with the American people. He has come across as entitled, expecting the nomination to just be handed to him because of his last name (Who does he think he is? Hillary?) and unwilling to make the sale.

I don’t know why Jeb Bush decided to run for the presidency this year. It has been more than a decade since his last political campaign and he is obviously out of practice and out of touch. I have never heard or read of anyone who is actually excited about the idea of Jeb Bush being the next president, except perhaps for a few big donors that make up what is called the Republican establishment. Bush himself doesn’t seem to know just why he is running.

But it is the last four paragraphs of Glenn Reynold’s column that I think are worth remembering.

 

But there’s another bright spot. Jeb’s trump card was supposed to be the money. He raised a lot of money, and he has spent a lot of money. But it didn’t help. And that undercuts all the money-in-politics talk we’ve been hearing for years.

Concerns about the impact of money on politics assume that if you buy enough ads, you can elect anybody. If that were true, Jeb would be the front-runner. Instead, he’s running way behind other candidates who, in different ways, have done a better job of addressing voters’ concerns.

It turns out that addressing voters’ concerns is more important than slick TV spots. And that means the only campaign finance “reform” we need is for candidates (and donors) to quit tossing money at consultants and instead to speak to the American people about what the American people care about.

If nothing else comes from Jeb’s candidacy, that’s a valuable lesson indeed. Let’s hope that we learn it.

 

If anyone wants to know the reason that Donald Trump is currently the front runner in the Republican while Bernie Sanders is running a remarkably successful insurgent campaign against Hilary Clinton, they need to understand that Trump and Sanders are, in different ways with different audiences addressing real concerns that many Americans really have about the future of their country in a way that more mainstream candidates have not been able to match. I get the impression that the members of our political establishment have begun to believe that they rule by some divine right rather than at the sufferance of the people. I don’t have much liking for Donald Trump and still less for Bernie Sanders, but they are providing a badly needed shakeup in both parties.

 

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The World Turned Upside Down

February 14, 2013

I have for some time suspected that the whole world is going mad, and every day I seem to find new evidence to back this contention. While driving today, around noon I turned my my car radio and listened to the first part of Rush Limbaugh‘s show. I like Rush well enough, but I don’t usually spend much time listening to him. This time, though, it was worth it. It seems that the top two stories on CNN the past day are whether Senator Marco Rubio has ruined his political career by taking a drink of water during his response to the President’s State of the Union address, and whether mass murderer Christopher Dorner is a hero. I wish I were making that up.

Here are some selections from the transcript of Rush Limbaugh’s show.

RUSH: Let’s do a little A-B, side-by-side comparison.  On the one hand, Marco Rubio may not be qualified, not only to be president, but to be US Senator.  He took a sip of water from an average looking bottle while delivering the answer to the State of the Union address on Tuesday night.

Meantime, elsewhere on that network, you’ve had panel discussions celebrating the relevance and the great contributions to fighting police brutality of a mass murderer, Christopher Dorner, on the very same network.  CNN had a panel all excited, and I’ve even got some additional tweets.  Listen to this, Marc Lamont Hill.  This guy’s a professor a Columbia University.  He was on CNN’s Newsroom yesterday afternoon with the anchorette infobabe Brooke Baldwin, and the infobabe said, “Do these Dorner sympathizers have a point?”  Now, keep in mind later on CNN, Wolf Blitzer was gonna ask whether or not a drink of water could ruin somebody’s career, whether they liked it or not, whether Rubio liked it or not.  But prior to that, this happened on CNN.

HILL:  This has been an important public conversation that we’ve had about police brutality, about police corruption, about state violence.  As far as Dorner himself goes, he’s been like a real-life superhero to many people.  Now, don’t get me wrong:  What he did was awful, killing innocent people.  He’s just bad.  But when you read his manifesto, when you read the message that he left, he wasn’t entirely crazy.  He had a plan and a mission here.  And many people aren’t rooting for him to kill innocent people.  They’re rooting for somebody who was wronged to get a kind of revenge against the system.  It’s like almost watching Django Unchained in real life.  It’s kind of exciting.

RUSH:  First day, I warned you they’re comparing this guy to Django, and here is a heralded, highly acclaimed professor — I don’t know what he teaches.  Doesn’t matter.  He could be teaching a course on ballroom dance and I guarantee you it’s politics.  Revenge, vengeance, grievance politics, whatever.  “It’s almost like watching Django Unchained in real life. It’s kind of exciting.”  So it’s not just the kooks on Twitter and Facebook, it’s now the liberals on CNN who are attaching legitimacy and value to Christopher Dorner.

Now remember that this is not just some nut tweeting. This is a guest on a show on CNN. It is simply unbelievable that a news organization with any pretense of responsible journalism (I know.) would have someone on who is essentially cheerleading a murderer. Of course since Dorner’s manifesto apparently repeated a standard list of leftist memes, perhaps it is only natural that people on the left might try to make him into some sort of folk hero. This celebration of a lunatic killer illustrates the moral incoherence of many people on the left. Here, by the way, is an excellent column on this subject by Dennis Prager.

It may very well be that Christopher Dorner had legitimate complaints about the actions of the LAPD. So what? That doesn’t make him any sort of hero. His ends do not justify his means.

Perhaps this is why so many people on the left feel that gun control is such an urgent necessity and why they accused the TEA Party of being violent and dangerous. These people seem to have a deep psychological need to glorify, and even fantasize about violence and so maybe cannot conceive of citizens peaceably assembling to petition for redress of grievances. They imagine that everyone is as unstable as they are and since they cannot be trusted to own guns, or really any sharp objects, and so believe that no one can be trusted.

Maybe I am wrong about this. If so, prove me wrong and stop cheering on criminals and mass murdering dictators.

 


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