A Man’s Home is His Castle, Not!

William Pitt was a great British statesman who lived over two hundred years ago. He had this to say about the sanctity of private property:

The poorest man may in his cottage bid defiance to all the force of the Crown. It may be frail; its roof may shake; the wind may blow through it; the storms may enter, the rain may enter,—but the King of England cannot enter; all his forces dare not cross the threshold of the ruined tenement!

That was then. Nowadays our leaders and would-be leaders have a quite different attitude. Take this statement by semi-serious presidential candidate Donald Trump regarding the Supreme Court’s Kelo decision:

Well, it’s sort of not a good one for me to say, because I noticed every article written about it said, “Will Donald Trump take over your home?” sort of using me as the example, Neil. And it’s sort of — it’s an interesting situation to be in. But I happen to agree with it 100 percent, not that I would want to use it. But the fact is, if you have a person living in an area that’s not even necessarily a good area, and government, whether it’s local or whatever, government wants to build a tremendous economic development, where a lot of people are going to be put to work and make area that’s not good into a good area, and move the person that’s living there into a better place — now, I know it might not be their choice — but move the person to a better place and yet create thousands upon thousands of jobs and beautification and lots of other things, I think it happens to be good. (Club for Growth)

The king can enter your house now and give it to someone who thinks he can use it better. Progress