Posts Tagged ‘Afghanistan’

Mullah Omar for President

July 12, 2012

Of Afghanistan, that is. I spotted this article from the Telegraph, while reading Atlas Shrugged, which is a blog you should be checking out every day.

Mullah Omar, the one-eyed Taliban leader who has been on run since the United States toppled his regime in late 2001, is one of the world’s most wanted men and is leading a Taliban insurgency aimed at ousting Karzai.

Karzai has repeatedly called on Omar and other insurgents fighting against his administration to renounce violence and accept peaceful reintegration.

“I repeat my call on all Afghans, those who aren’t the puppets of others and have (only) issues with us at home – they’re welcome for any talks,” he told a news conference.

Mullah Mohammad Omar can come inside Afghanistan anywhere he wants to. He can open political office for himself but he should leave the gun.

“He along with his friends can come and create his political party, do politics, become a candidate himself for the elections. If people voted for him, good for him, he can take the leadership in his hand,” Karzai said.

Karzai is supposed to be our major non-NATO ally? The Taliban are a truly evil group and I can’t imagine ever wanting to negotiate with them for any reason. That fool in the White House, who is always ready to accommodate America’s enemies thinks otherwise.

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Sacred Beliefs Here and There

May 3, 2012

Now that Newt Gingrich has suspended his campaign for president, I hope he will have more time to write and think about policies. I read his last column in Human Events and I am afraid that Newt simply does not understand the difference between sacred beliefs in Afghanistan and here in America and why those beliefs must be respected there but not here.

The Obama administration may have adopted a formula that will come back to haunt it.

In an effort to appease religious elements in Afghanistan it has established a standard that could become a major defeat for secular extremists here in America.

In response to Afghan outrage over the inadvertent Koran burnings by the U.S. Military in February, the Obama Defense Department created a mandatory training for military service members in the region. It is entitled, “Proper handling and disposal of Islamic Religious Materials: Service Members/Civilian Training.”

You can read the 11 slides in the briefing here.

The most fascinating slide is the last one. There the Obama administration asserts: “We will hold sacred the beliefs held sacred by others.”

Apparently to President Obama, the sacred beliefs of Islam in Afghanistan must be held sacred by the U.S. government, but Christianity in America is a nuisance to be reshaped by ObamaCare, the courts and the bureaucracy with no regard for its beliefs.

Americans are noticing. Consider this protest from a Catholic group as reported to me by my friend and co-author Bill Forstchen:

“Without doubt the most powerful ad, aimed straight at Catholics, to take a political stand based upon our most basic beliefs.  This one is incredible and you know I rarely forward such things.”

You can see the video here.

The ObamaCare war against religious liberty extends far beyond Catholics. As the president of Louisiana College, a Baptist college dedicated to right-to-life principles told me, “If Obamacare forces us to violate our religious beliefs we will close the college.”

Let’s challenge President Obama’s assertion that “We will hold sacred the beliefs held sacred by others”.

If we must hold sacred Korans being used by Afghan terrorists to pass messages back and forth, then certainly we can hold sacred religious symbols held sacred by law-abiding Americans here in the United States. We can put back up the crosses and the Ten Commandments courts have forced us to take down—right?

If President Obama doesn’t object to Afghan children praying five times a day in school (he cited his own childhood memories of studying the Koran at school in Indonesia and hearing the call to prayer), why isn’t he open to allowing American school children to pray once a day, if they choose?

By its own words the Obama administration has set the test for defining itself.

Is Obama prepared to “hold sacred the beliefs held sacred by others” if those others are Americans?

Congress should put President Obama to the test and him to his new rule—first by passing legislation overriding the Health and Human Services Mandate that was an overt attack on the Catholic Church.

Silly Newt. There is a very good reason that religious beliefs in Afghanistan must be respected while in America we are free to disparage and ridicule them. You see Christians don’t usually blow people up when they are disrespected. Moslems have been known to do that.

Apologies

February 27, 2012

By now the burning of Korans by US forces in Afghanistan is old news, as is President Obama’s apology, although the rioting and killings continue. As far as I am concerned an apology would certainly have been appropriate if a delegation of Afghans had peacefully approached the commander of the US base and explained to him that this action was not appropriate, etc. But, that is not what happened. Instead, the Afghans began rioting, probably incited by the Taliban. Under such circumstances, no apology from any American is warranted or should have been offered.

I think we need to make it very clear that desecrating a Koran does not justify taking the life of a single human being. In fact, the burning of a whole pile of Korans does not justify the murder of a single human being. To apologize while rioting is going on muddles the issue and tends to lend credence to the idea that the murders are justified. Not to mention making more dangerous for the troops serving there.

I would like to add that if Muslims are outraged by the desecration of the Koran, well, I am outraged by the contents of this “holy” book. I am outraged by the misogyny, the anti-Semitism, the calls for violence against the unbelievers, the description of unbelievers as the worst of people, and many, many other ideas and themes of that book. As far as I am concerned, The Koran belongs on my bookshelf right next to Mein Kampf, although I will say that Mein Kampf was better written.

I can’t tell the difference.


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