Posts Tagged ‘9/11’

Prosecute Them?

December 19, 2014

Shortly after I finished that last post I checked my e-mail and found this.

David-

Please sign the petition by Daily Kos and Demand Progress demanding accountability for the just-revealed torture by the CIA.

The Senate Intelligence Committee has released the CIA torture report — after over 170,000 people signed our petition demanding they do so — and the details make us sick to our stomachs.

Simply put, the United States has tortured people — meaning “waterboarding” and much more — in direct violation of its own War Crimes Act.  And it violates the U.N. Convention Against Torture — which President Ronald Reagan signed.

We cannot allow what happened in the Bush-Cheney Administration to happen again.

Attorney General Eric Holder must appoint a special prosecutor to hold accountable those who committed such crimes, and the Obama Administration must dismiss CIA head John Brennan and all employees at the CIA who were involved.

But despite his purported opposition to torture, President Obama isn’t going create meaningful repercussions for it unless we force him to:

Sign the petition by Daily Kos and Demand Progress: Demand accountability. Dismiss and prosecute all those at the CIA responsible for authorizing and overseeing the implementation of torture.

Thanks.

-Demand Progress

As I said before, it is unfortunate that such things as enhanced interrogation techniques, or torture if you will, are used by agencies of the United States government. In an ideal world, no one working for the US government would ever use such techniques nor would they be necessary. We do not live in that ideal world. In the real world, there are people who want to do us harm. I am not greatly concerned about the civil rights of such people nor do I care very much for their reasons for wanting to harm us. It may well be that they have legitimate grievances against US policies.  I do not care. Whatever reasons they may have do not justify the murder of innocent Americans. I am not willing to risk the lives of my fellow Americans just to satisfy critics who will never be satisfied. If torture is at all effective at gaining information that will prevent another 9/11 than it can and should be used. I am also not willing to see the people tasked with preventing another such atrocity prosecuted for trying to protect us.

Torture is bad, there is no doubt about it, but we are not always given a clear choice between good and bad. More often the choice is between less bad and more bad. I can think of worse things than torturing suspected terrorists. If the people at Demand Progress and Daily Kos believe that the use of torture somehow causes the US to lose the moral high ground (as if these people on the left will ever concede that the US has ever held the high ground) perhaps they need to be reminded of just who our enemies are and what they can do.

Waterboarding doesn’t seem so bad, does it?

 

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Thirteen Years

September 11, 2014

It has been thirteen years since 9/11. We said that we would never forget, but I am afraid we are already forgetting. A person turning eighteen this year, old enough to vote, was only five on that fateful day. I don’t imagine that they would have any clear personal memories of that day, unless they or someone close was personally affected. I am afraid that we are trying to forget the most important lesson of 9/11, that the world is a dangerous place, and there are people out there who would like to destroy us, even if Barack Obama, the lightworker, is the president. Judging from the headlines, we are already relearning the fact that withdrawing from the world will not make the bad guys decide to leave us alone. ISIS has already murdered at least two of our people and has threatened to attack our cities. I have no doubt they would have already, if they had the means. So, we are going to war in Iraq once again.

Well, I will never forget that dreadful day thirteen years ago, no matter how long I live. We will just have to keep telling the story to the younger generations so they will not have to experience any such attacks for themselves. With that in mind, I am going to copy what I wrote two years ago.

On that Tuesday morning, I was at work, driving from Madison to North Vernon when I got a call from my wife. She asked me if I were listening to the radio. I was not. She told me to turn it on because something terrible was happening. I turned my car radio on and listened to the coverage of the attack.

I went about my duties at the stores in North Vernon in a sort of state of shock.  The North Vernon WalMart and Jay C played continuing news coverage of the day’s events instead of the usual soothing Musak. Not too many people were working or shopping in the stores. They were mostly just listening.

I had to go to Seymour for a meeting that afternoon. On the way I noticed that some gas stations had raised the price of gasoline to a then unheard of price of $5 per gallon. At the meeting, no one wanted to discus the business at hand. Instead we talked about the terrorist attack. It seemed certain to us all that more attacks were on the way and that this time we couldn’t just launch a few missiles, blow up some tents, and then move on. We were in for a long fight.

I don’t remember much about the rest of that day. I went home but I don’t remember much about it.

I was once in the World Trade Center. I was in New York with some friends as a sort of tourist and we took the elevator to the top floor of one of the twin towers. There was a gallery up there where you could look out over the city of New York. The day was foggy so I didn’t see anything. They had a gift shop in the center section of the floor. It sickens me to think that the people who worked there went to work one morning, and then had to choose between burning to death or jumping, Not to mention the tourists, who only wanted to look at the city.

It still sickens me to think about the people who were only doing their jobs having to lose their lives.

twin

 

Eleven Years Since 9/11

September 11, 2012

 

Another year has gone by and it is September 11 again. I am not sure if I really have anything to add to my comments from last year. There have been memorials going on all over the country and the world, but all of these are useless if we do not heed the lessons we should have learned from that tragic day.

I know that few Americans are paying attentions to foreign affairs lately. We have a bad economy to contend with and a presidential election coming up. I wish that more Americans, including some in the White House, would realize that the world is still a dangerous place, even if Osama bin Ladin is no longer in it. We ought to be a lot more concerned about how the Arab Spring is rapidly turning into the Islamic nightmare all over the Middle East. We ought to be thinking how many more bin Ladins there are in the next generation of young Arabs, who are frustrated by the abject failure of their societies and decide to take those frustrations out on the successful, this time with the full support of an Islamist government in Egypt, Syria, or Turkey.

We also should get over the political correctness and admit that Islam is a problem. I know that the great majority of Muslims are like anyone else and want no trouble with their neighbors. The problem is that Islamic theology recognizes no distinction between mosque and state and Islamic scriptures do encourage violence against unbelievers. I really don’t know what the answer to this problem is, but pretending that Islam is a religion of peace and tolerance will not make the problem go away, nor will pretending that the Muslim Brotherhood is secular or that Iran does not want nuclear weapons.

Meanwhile, we remember and hope that we never have cause to mourn again.

May God continue to bless America.

 

 

Dennis Prager is Wrong, for Once

May 12, 2011

Dennis Prager is usually right on target with his columns and radio show, but I happen to disagree with some things he said in his latest column,  How Leftism Poisoned a Psychiatrist’s Mind. The column concerns one Richard Klitzman, whose sister was killed on 9/11. Writing in the New York Times, Klitzman stated that although he was glad Osama bin Laden was killed, we need to understand what policies and acts we have done to cause people like Osama bin Laden to hate us so much he wanted to attack us.

Prager is rightly indignant at this attitude, comparing to asking what the Jews did to inspire the Nazis to hate them, or what Blacks did to cause whites to lynch them, and several other examples. but then Prager writes:

I suspect that Klitzman is a morally better man than his thesis suggests. But at some point, perhaps in college, he assimilated the leftist worldview with the dogmatic but meaningless phrases that appeared in his column: “underlying forces of greed and hate,” “American imperialism,” “corporate avarice” and “abuses of our power abroad.”

Most people who hold left-wing views when they are young abandon those views as they get older and wiser. But for those who never abandon leftism, the dogma is so powerful, it functions as a fundamentalist — secular — religion. Just as the Orthodox Jew, the evangelical Christian and the traditionalist Catholic views the world through his respective religion’s eyes, so the leftist views the world and everything in it through leftist eyes.

That is how a man whose profession is dedicated to the elimination of psychological pain through the study of the infinitely complex human mind and psyche can have such a simplistic and morally convoluted view of America that he uses his sister’s murder as an occasion to reflect on the evil — of America.

One more example of how leftism makes decent people do indecent things.

I don’t agree. A person is what he does and what he thinks. If Richard Klitzman’s mind is full of these sorts of thoughts, than he is not a decent person, whatever he may appear to be on the outside. On the inside he is vile.


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