Trump for President?

There are so many reasons why this is a bad idea, but here is just one. See here too.

Vera Coking is a retired homeowner in Atlantic City, New Jersey whose home was the focus of a prominent eminent domain case involving Donald Trump.

In 1993, when Donald Trump sought to expand his property holdings around his Atlantic City casino and hotel (to build a parking lot designed for limousines), he bought several lots adjacent to his property.[1] Coking, who had lived in her house at that time for about 35 years, refused to sell. This was not the first time Coking had been asked to sell her property for development. When Coking refused to sell to Trump, the city of Atlantic City condemned her house, using the power of eminent domain. Her designated compensation was to be $251,000,[2] about one quarter of what it had been valued ten years earlier.

This really doesn’t look good, Trump trying to force an old lady out of her home. I can’t help but wonder how many other bombshells in his past waiting to be unearthed.

Obama would cut deficit by $4 trillion in 12 years

I have to say I am more than a little skeptical about any deficit reduction plan put forward by President Obama, considering that he has been the biggest spender, at least since LBJ. Yes I know that Bush was a big spender too, but he isn’t president anymore and Obama is worse by an order of magnitude.

US Citizen Detained in North Korea

Why in the world would anyone want to go to North Korea.

STOCKHOLM – Sweden’s Foreign Ministry says an American citizen was arrested in North Korea and that Swedish diplomats are representing the U.S. in the case.

Ministry spokesman Teo Zetterman says “an American citizen has been detained in North Korea. That’s all we can say.”

He told the AP on Tuesday that Sweden is dealing with North Korean authorities on behalf of the U.S. in the case. Zetterman wouldn’t give the name of the American citizen or discuss the circumstances or date of the American’s arrest, referring questions to the U.S. State Department.

The Swedish Embassy in Pyongyang represents the United States because the U.S. doesn’t have diplomatic relations with North Korea.

I mean, what’s in North Korea that anyone would want to see?

I Can’t Drive 85

The Texas House of Representatives is considering raising the speed limit up to 85 mph on some highways.

 

As lead singer of Van Halen, Sammy Hagar once crooned, “I can’t drive 55.” To show how far things have come, now some Texans aren’t happy about only driving 80 miles per hour. The Legislature is considering raising the maximum speed limit to 85 mph, highest in the country.The Texas House of Representatives has approved a bill that would raise the speed limit to 85 mph on some highways. The bill now goes to the state Senate, the Austin Statesman reports.

We suspect Sammy, shown at right back in 1995 when California raised its speed limit from 55 mph to 65 mph, would be pleased.

Texas currently has more than 520 miles of interstate highways where the speed limit is 80 mph, according to the Associated Press. The bill would allow the Texas Department of Transportation to raise the speed limit on certain roads or lanes after engineering and traffic studies are conducted. The 85-mph maximum would likely be permitted on rural roads with long sightlines.

 

Since I get nervous just driving 70 mph, I think I won’t be going to Texas anytime soon.

Nice businesss you have there. Shame if something happened to it.

Take a look at this. Is there any real difference between the public unions and the Mafia?

 

Members of Wisconsin State Employees Union, AFSCME Council 24, have begun circulating letters to businesses in southeast Wisconsin, asking them to support workers’ rights by putting up a sign in their windows.

If businesses fail to comply, the letter says, “Failure to do so will leave us no choice but (to) do a public boycott of your business. And sorry, neutral means ‘no’ to those who work for the largest employer in the area and are union members.”

Jim Parrett, a field representative of Council 24 for Southeast Wisconsin, confirmed the contents of the letter, which carries his signature. But he added that the union was also circulating letters to businesses thanking them for supporting workers’ rights.

Parrett said that since the letters were sent out, he has received threatening phone calls as well as calls from people supporting the state workers.

“I’ve gotten a lot of threatening phone calls,” Parrett said.

And apparently these kind of threats could be illegal under Wisconsin law. See this.

 

 

 

 

What Happened to the American Declaration of War

What Happened to the American Declaration of War? is republished with permission of STRATFOR.

That is a very good question. World War 2 is the last war in which we had an actual declaration of war. Since then Congress has sort of relinquished the powers of war and peace to the Executive.