The President Speaks

And I wish that he would just shut up. Here is a full transcript of his remarks. I was going to copy them here but they are rather long, so I will only put in excerpts that I wish to comment upon.

First of all, I want to make sure that, once again, I send my thoughts and prayers, as well as Michelle’s, to the family of Trayvon Martin, and to remark on the incredible grace and dignity with which they’ve dealt with the entire situation. I can only imagine what they’re going through, and it’s remarkable how they’ve handled it.

What about the family of George Zimmerman? They are living in fear because of the large number of death threats they have received. Does the president have nothing to say to them? What about George Zimmerman? Can he not affirm that he was acquitted and should not be terrorized?

The second thing I want to say is to reiterate what I said on Sunday, which is there’s going to be a lot of arguments about the legal issues in the case — I’ll let all the legal analysts and talking heads address those issues. The judge conducted the trial in a professional manner. The prosecution and the defense made their arguments. The juries were properly instructed that in a case such as this reasonable doubt was relevant, and they rendered a verdict. And once the jury has spoken, that’s how our system works. But I did want to just talk a little bit about context and how people have responded to it and how people are feeling.

You know, when Trayvon Martin was first shot I said that this could have been my son. Another way of saying that is Trayvon Martin could have been me 35 years ago. And when you think about why, in the African American community at least, there’s a lot of pain around what happened here, I think it’s important to recognize that the African American community is looking at this issue through a set of experiences and a history that doesn’t go away.

There are very few African American men in this country who haven’t had the experience of being followed when they were shopping in a department store. That includes me. There are very few African American men who haven’t had the experience of walking across the street and hearing the locks click on the doors of cars. That happens to me — at least before I was a senator. There are very few African Americans who haven’t had the experience of getting on an elevator and a woman clutching her purse nervously and holding her breath until she had a chance to get off. That happens often.

If President Obama had a son, he would not be Trayvon Martin. He would be attending an exclusive private school, just as the President’s daughters are attending and he would have many opportunities that other Americans, White or Black, do not have. Barack Obama spent much of his young life either abroad, or being raised by his White mother and his White grandmother in predominantly White and well off neighborhoods. He has led a life of privilege. Trayvon Martin was not attending a private college-prep school, like Obama did, and it is very unlikely that he would have been able to attend Harvard Law School, no matter how bright he might have been. Barack Obama’s life experiences have not been typical of most African-Americans, no matter how much he would like to pretend they have.

And so the fact that sometimes that’s unacknowledged adds to the frustration. And the fact that a lot of African American boys are painted with a broad brush and the excuse is given, well, there are these statistics out there that show that African American boys are more violent — using that as an excuse to then see sons treated differently causes pain.

It is not an excuse. It experience teaches us that African American boys are more likely to commit a violence crime, then it is sensible to be wary of African American boys. If Asian girls or Native American transvestites committed a disproporionate share of the crimes in the US, people would be wary of them. The question must be, what are we going to do about this, besides blaming racism.

I think the African American community is also not naïve in understanding that, statistically, somebody like Trayvon Martin was statistically more likely to be shot by a peer than he was by somebody else. So folks understand the challenges that exist for African American boys. But they get frustrated, I think, if they feel that there’s no context for it and that context is being denied. And that all contributes I think to a sense that if a white male teen was involved in the same kind of scenario, that, from top to bottom, both the outcome and the aftermath might have been different.

If a White male teen had knocked an armed man to the ground and was pummeling him, the outcome might have been much the same. The only difference is that the race hustlers and the Left would have had nothing to work with and the case would never have gotten national attention.

Now, the question for me at least, and I think for a lot of folks, is where do we take this? How do we learn some lessons from this and move in a positive direction? I think it’s understandable that there have been demonstrations and vigils and protests, and some of that stuff is just going to have to work its way through, as long as it remains nonviolent. If I see any violence, then I will remind folks that that dishonors what happened to Trayvon Martin and his family. But beyond protests or vigils, the question is, are there some concrete things that we might be able to do.

I know that Eric Holder is reviewing what happened down there, but I think it’s important for people to have some clear expectations here. Traditionally, these are issues of state and local government, the criminal code. And law enforcement is traditionally done at the state and local levels, not at the federal levels.

I think Eric Holder should leave George Zimmerman alone. The constitution forbids double jeopardy for a reason

Number one, precisely because law enforcement is often determined at the state and local level, I think it would be productive for the Justice Department, governors, mayors to work with law enforcement about training at the state and local levels in order to reduce the kind of mistrust in the system that sometimes currently exists.

If he wants to reduce the mistrust that currently exists, how about reining in Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton.

When I was in Illinois, I passed racial profiling legislation, and it actually did just two simple things. One, it collected data on traffic stops and the race of the person who was stopped. But the other thing was it resourced us training police departments across the state on how to think about potential racial bias and ways to further professionalize what they were doing.

And initially, the police departments across the state were resistant, but actually they came to recognize that if it was done in a fair, straightforward way that it would allow them to do their jobs better and communities would have more confidence in them and, in turn, be more helpful in applying the law. And obviously, law enforcement has got a very tough job.

And I’m doing my best to make it tougher.

I know that there’s been commentary about the fact that the “stand your ground” laws in Florida were not used as a defense in the case. On the other hand, if we’re sending a message as a society in our communities that someone who is armed potentially has the right to use those firearms even if there’s a way for them to exit from a situation, is that really going to be contributing to the kind of peace and security and order that we’d like to see?

And for those who resist that idea that we should think about something like these “stand your ground” laws, I’d just ask people to consider, if Trayvon Martin was of age and armed, could he have stood his ground on that sidewalk? And do we actually think that he would have been justified in shooting Mr. Zimmerman who had followed him in a car because he felt threatened? And if the answer to that question is at least ambiguous, then it seems to me that we might want to examine those kinds of laws.

We ought not to allow people to defend themselves. To answer the question, if Mr. Zimmerman had assaulted Martin, then certainly Martin would have had the right to stand his ground and defend himself.

And then, finally, I think it’s going to be important for all of us to do some soul-searching. There has been talk about should we convene a conversation on race. I haven’t seen that be particularly productive when politicians try to organize conversations. They end up being stilted and politicized, and folks are locked into the positions they already have. On the other hand, in families and churches and workplaces, there’s the possibility that people are a little bit more honest, and at least you ask yourself your own questions about, am I wringing as much bias out of myself as I can? Am I judging people as much as I can, based on not the color of their skin, but the content of their character? That would, I think, be an appropriate exercise in the wake of this tragedy.

The truth is that you can not be honest about matters of race in this country. But if we want to have that conversation, why don’t we start with the fact that many Blacks are prejudiced against Whites?

And let me just leave you with a final thought that, as difficult and challenging as this whole episode has been for a lot of people, I don’t want us to lose sight that things are getting better. Each successive generation seems to be making progress in changing attitudes when it comes to race. It doesn’t mean we’re in a post-racial society. It doesn’t mean that racism is eliminated. But when I talk to Malia and Sasha, and I listen to their friends and I seem them interact, they’re better than we are — they’re better than we were — on these issues. And that’s true in every community that I’ve visited all across the country.

And so we have to be vigilant and we have to work on these issues. And those of us in authority should be doing everything we can to encourage the better angels of our nature, as opposed to using these episodes to heighten divisions. But we should also have confidence that kids these days, I think, have more sense than we did back then, and certainly more than our parents did or our grandparents did; and that along this long, difficult journey, we’re becoming a more perfect union — not a perfect union, but a more perfect union.

The tragedy of Barack Obama is that he could have done much to promote racial healing in this country. Being half White and half Black he could have been a sort of bridge bring people together. Most Whites were happy to see a Black man being elected president. Barack Obama chose not to play that role. He decided to embrace the politics of division, of envy, of class hatred and racial animosity. His country is the worse for it.

 

 

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One Response to “The President Speaks”

  1. George Zimmerman is a Good Man | David's Commonplace Book Says:

    […] is life in Obama’s America. George Zimmerman has been declared an enemy of the people, by the President himself and anyone who gives him aid and comfort faces the wrath of the mob. Well, I will praise him, where […]

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