Anyone Can Vote

You don’t even have to prove you are an American citizen. At least so the Supreme Court has decreed.

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday struck down an Arizona law that required people registering to vote in federal elections to show proof of citizenship, a victory for activists who said it had discouraged Native Americans and Latinos from voting.

In a 7-2 vote, the court, in an opinion written by conservative Justice Antonin Scalia, ruled the voter registration provision of the 2004 state law was trumped by a federal law, the 1993 National Voter Registration Act.

The state law was opposed by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund and Indian tribes. They said it deterred legal voters who did not have the required paperwork from registering to vote.

It was another setback for the Republican leadership of a state, bordering Mexico, that has tried to crack down on illegal immigrants at a time when Hispanics represent the largest U.S. minority at nearly 17 percent of the population.

Both major political parties in Congress, aware of the increasingly influential Latino vote nationally, are trying to overhaul immigration laws with a bill that could provide a 13-year path to citizenship for 11 million illegal immigrants.

At the same time, the high court made clear that Arizona could still have other ways to assert its argument that it should be allowed to ask for proof of citizenship. That would be the subject of separate litigation, the court said.

“It is a bit of a mixed bag, but at the end of the day it does reaffirm the absolute right to vote,” said Arizona state Senator Steve Gallardo, a Democrat.

Gallardo said the law unfairly made it seem as if there was massive fraud among Latino voters, which has never been proven. For a year, the Arizona Republican Party … (has) been using different methods to disenfranchise Latino voters,” he said.

Arizona Republican Attorney General Tom Horne, who argued the case, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The state’s Republican leadership had said the law was meant to fight voter fraud, but Democrats countered that Republicans who championed the measures aimed to make it harder for minority voters who tend to vote Democratic to cast ballots.

So naturally you do not have to actually prove that you are eligible to vote in order to register to vote. This is unfortunate since it opens the way for a certain unscrupulous political party to register large numbers of illegal aliens who can then reliably vote for that party, just as they have made ample use of zombie voters.

There is a silver lining here in that the Supreme Court did uphold the principle that Arizona could seek to require proof of citizenship in a way that is less burdensome. J Christian Adams at PJMedia believes that this decision is, in fact, a victory for conservatives and perhaps he knows best.

Personally, I believe that there should be voter suppression, of the ignorant and ill-informed. In other words, rather than making it easier and more convenient for idiots to vote, we ought to make it more difficult and troublesome. For that reason, I take a dim view of such innovations as having people register at welfare offices, BMV branches, voting by internet and mail, and the like. I think a lot of the problems in this country, especially our venial, stupid and corrupt political class are directly attributable to our current practice of trying to get as many people as possible to vote. But, that’s just my, not entirely serious, opinion.

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